Asian School of the Environment - Research

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Global environmental change and geohazards are threatening resources and environmental predictability that human societies rely on. The ASE researchers work towards goals such as:

  • Better sea level rise risk assessment for the millions of people living in low elevation coastal zones
  • Sustainable management of tropical peatlands for fire and haze prevention, and reduced greenhouse gas emissions
  • Improved forecasts of the magnitude and character of volcanic and earthquake activity
  • Risk assessment of unprecedented weather patterns created by climate change
  • Understanding the response of tropical marine and terrestrial ecosystems to global warming, ocean acidification, deforestation, biodiversity loss etc.

Research News

Last week a three day workshop on “Nutrient Cycling in Tropical Harbours” was held at the ASE. Participants from Singapore, Indonesia, East and West Malaysia, China and Australia discussed the state of current knowledge with regard to nutrient cycling in tropical coastal waters. Sessions covered ‘nutrient budgets and observational data’, ‘modelling studies’, and ‘organic nutrient...

Imagine that you are born with a talent for swimming. Still, in order to get really good at swimming you also need to have access to swimming pool, good coaches, and having a swim team to join will certainly help. How good you get at swimming will depend on a combination of several factors; your ability to learn the skill, as well as your social and physical environment. Among wild...

“I could climb trees like a young chimp and if challenged, could even swing upside down from branches.”

The quote is from the book Kampong Spirit Gotong Royong. Life in Potong Pasir, 1955 – 1965 by Josephine Chia, (pp. 62), depicting life in a Singapore kampong during the years leading up to independence. The incredibly fast development that then followed as the city state...

The rainforests of Southeast Asia have some of the most diverse ecosystems on earth, but are also among the most severely threatened. Many threats to this biodiversity are of a global nature, such as urban development, pollution and global warming, but where to start if we want to address these problems here in Southeast Asia? What knowledge is needed to help advance biodiversity...

Hundreds of millions of people in Southeast Asia, live in low-lying coastal societies that are vulnerable to extreme sea level events. The impact of events such as mean sea level rise, storm surges and extreme tides on densely populated and/or highly developed coastlines can be devastating and also very costly. However, our ability to predict and prepare for such events is improving....